Glückskinder (1936)

This 1936 UFA comedy is trying to emulate Hollywood’s new, successful Screwball formula. It appears to be a high effort production and many things in this film work nicely, but the story is too convoluted and the construction of the plot seems far from perfect. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

Topper Returns (1941)

Cosmo Topper is back, and so is his uncanny propensity to attract ghosts.
This third and final film gets away from the original books and takes the franchise genre-wise in an entirely new direction: a haunted house murder-mystery case. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

Topper Takes a Trip (1938)

Cosmo Topper is still haunted by his ghostly experiences from Topper (1937). And since his marriage is breaking down as a consequence of those previous events, Marion Kerby’s ghost reappears in order to put things right again. But of course, as happened with her well-meaning “help” in the first film, she mostly creates more chaos. This film is shorter as the first film, and seems better paced and better written. So, in spite of Cary Grant’s absence, this sequel is more enjoyable than the previous film. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

Topper (1937)

The well-regulated life of mild-mannered bank manager Cosmo Topper is turned upside down when couple of yuppie ghosts decide to bully him into living a little. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

The Animal Kingdom (1932)

A romantic drama with very few comedic elements, The Animal Kingdom features a male protagonist who needs to figure out what he wants to do with his life. There is a nice role for a third-billed Myrna Loy in this film. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

False Pretenses (1935)

An entertaining “romantic” comedy which is rather cynical when it comes to romance and matrimony. This little poverty row B-picture benefits from very good acting performances and some witty dialogue. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

The Thin Man Goes Home (1944)

The fifth entry into The Thin Man franchise differs slightly in tone from the previous films. It is influenced by the war economy and the filmmakers' desire to swap Nick and Nora's lavish cosmopolitan life-syle for that of picturesque small-town America. And that not only means a different setting and life-style, but also a slightly different set of values. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

The Out-of-Towners (1970)

Considering this film stars Jack Lemmon and is highly-rated, I found The Out-of-Towners to be a disappointment. Nothing clicks here, at least not for me. +++ +++ [but you are free to click on the title to read my review]

Money Means Nothing (1934)

Produced by a “poverty row” studio, Money Means Nothing is a half-baked B-movie which wastes a solid premise, interesting characters, and a really good cast. There is objectively no reason why anyone should see this. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

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