Whistling in the Dark (1941)

A writer and actor of radio detective dramas gets into trouble when real-life crooks try to employ his creative mind for their own nefarious purposes. This is the first of Red Skelton’s three “Whistling in …” films. It is for the most part rather nicely paced and entertaining enough, even though Skelton’s antics seem not entirely the right choice for the character and genre. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

The Animal Kingdom (1932)

A romantic drama with very few comedic elements, The Animal Kingdom features a male protagonist who needs to figure out what he wants to do with his life. There is a nice role for a third-billed Myrna Loy in this film. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

The Dock Brief (1962)

This comedydrama, known in the US under the title Trial and Error, is a very unusual satire, told in a quaint way. You can always clearly see that this film is based on a play. Being for the most part a two-men-play, The Dock Brief's biggest asset is its lead-combo of Richard Attenborough and Peter Sellers. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

The Chiltern Hundreds (1949)

The Chiltern Hundreds is a highly amusing British comedy with lots of charm. David Tomlinson plays a mild-mannered young man who gets dragged into post-war party politics against his will. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

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