One, Two, Three (1961)

Lilo Pulver is celebrating her 92nd birthday today, and that is a nicely timed opportunity to post my review of Billy Wilder’s legendary comedy One, Two, Three, which I had re-watched recently. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

DM-Killer (1965)

A flawed social satire, DM-Killer aims too high and misses in more than one respect. Starring Curd Jürgens and Daliah Lavi, this German film about three ex-convicts trying to get rich the honest way is interesting more in the study of its flaws than its plot or attempted message. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

Casino Royale (1967)

Casino Royale is a comedy spoofing the character and world of James Bond as seen in the first four Bond films, especially the franchise’s obsession with nubile young women. The film consists of a number of “episodes” split up between five-and-a-half directors; and one of the lead actors was fired half-way through the film. Still, while the plot is nonsensical and incoherent, there are some enjoyable elements to be found here; but they are few and far between. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

Carry On Cruising (1962)

The first-ever Carry On film in colour, Carry On Cruising benefits from a nice soundstage set and an interesting, mildly lavish wardrobe. The characters are enjoyable, and the story flows nicely enough, but while this is a decent film there is nothing that stands out in particular. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

Carry On Regardless (1961)

In this fifth instalment in the Carry On franchise, the premise of having the characters work in a temp agency doing all sorts of odd jobs gives writer Norman Hudis the excuse to explore any idea that occurs to him, with little thought having to be wasted on how this will hold together in the end. So this paper-thin premise provides the basis for a string of amusing scenes in which the characters – as usual in this franchise – are out of their collective depth. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

Carry On Constable (1960)

The fourth film in the Carry On franchise is closer to Carry on Sergeant than the other two early films. Just as Erik Barker’s character in that first film had his work cut out trying to teach a bunch of National Service recruits a bit of halfway decent soldiering, Sidney James’s character in Carry On Constable has to try and police his district with only a handful of police academy volunteers. And all this with a gang of robbers on the run. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

Carry On Spying (1964)

This black & white spy film spoof is a nice, entertaining comedy. The great performances and convincing visuals go a long way to sell the film’s thin-ish plot. Considering the franchise's mixed reputation Carry On Spying is not a bad film at all. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

The Comedy of Terrors (1963)

This is a black comedy about an undertaker creating his own demand. It is an entertaining film, which first and foremost benefits from a great cast including horror icons Vincent Price and Boris Karloff. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

The Plank (1967 & 1979)

The two versions of The Plank by Eric Sykes qualify as sound effect comedies (more or less), and they are of interest for their take on silent acting and dialogue-free humour. They are, however, not as accomplished as 1970's Simon Simon. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

The Dock Brief (1962)

This comedydrama, known in the US under the title Trial and Error, is a very unusual satire, told in a quaint way. You can always clearly see that this film is based on a play. Being for the most part a two-men-play, The Dock Brief's biggest asset is its lead-combo of Richard Attenborough and Peter Sellers. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

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