Les Patterson Saves the World (1987)

Les Patterson is a hopeless diplomat who causes about as much damage to Australia’s global reputation as this film did to Australia’s film industry. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

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Carry On Spying (1964)

This black & white spy film spoof is a nice, entertaining comedy. The great performances and convincing visuals go a long way to sell the film’s thin-ish plot. Considering the franchises mixed reputation Carry On Spying is not a bad film at all. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

Topper Takes a Trip (1938)

Cosmo Topper is still haunted by his ghostly experiences from Topper (1937). And since his marriage is breaking down as a consequence of those previous events, Marion Kerby’s ghost reappears in order to put things right again. But of course, as happened with her well-meaning “help” in the first film, she mostly creates more chaos. This film is shorter as the first film, and seems better paced and better written. So, in spite of Cary Grant’s absence, this sequel is more enjoyable than the previous film. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

Topper (1937)

The well-regulated life of mild-mannered bank manager Cosmo Topper is turned upside down when couple of yuppie ghosts decide to bully him into living a little. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

Colonel Effingham’s Raid (1946)

Colonel Effingham's Raid is a weird WW2-era film that tries to blend messages about the fight against fascism abroad with the problem of a lack of democratic accountability in local government in a fictional American town. And if you think this sounds like it would make for a rather odd mix, you are absolutely right. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid (1982)

In this well-known film noir spoof, Steve Martin plays a 1940s private eye who is hired by a beautiful young woman to investigate the death of her father. Filmed entirely in black & white, Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid also uses footage from old films featuring many a famous face. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

Country Gentlemen (1936)

A minor outing for comedy duo Olsen & Johnson, produced by Republic Pictures. It is a con-men story featuring very few convincing cons, and even less convincing con-men. While at times charming and mildly entertaining, this is a film you can easily skip. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

The Nut Farm (1935)

This B-movie from poverty row studio Monogram Pictures has a thin plot, but it has nice performances and takes place in an interesting "sphere". The bulk of its plot deals with the pitfalls of Hollywood, the crooked accounting and other shady practices represented by a dodgy producer embodied marvellously by Bradley Page. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

The Animal Kingdom (1932)

A romantic drama with very few comedic elements, The Animal Kingdom features a male protagonist who needs to figure out what he wants to do with his life. There is a nice role for a third-billed Myrna Loy in this film. +++ +++ [click title to read review]

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